Greendale : Hearse Theater


NY

Every chapter of the Greendale tale will be seen sequentially over the next few weeks, running for a few days each as the story of ‘Sun Green’ unfolds in all of its super eight CRAZY HORSE glory. Larry Johnson and I shot this back in the early part of this century and we had the time of our lives! Shakey Pictures hopes you enjoy the show!
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EXPERIMENTATION WITHOUT FEAR : JOURNEY THROUGH THE PAST


NY

When I started Journey Through the Past, I remember wanting to do something other than records and touring. I was sure that spending time away would be good for my music. I think it was.

Actually, making JTTP was a pure joy for me. I was not trying to impress anyone with my film making prowess and I succeeded. Filmed with David Meyers as Director of Photography, it was a joy! I was just trying to paint a picture, a non linear expression with my friends, Larry Johnson, Jeanne Field, Mazzeo, McCracken and others. Carrie Snodgress , my partner, was supportive as ever and we were not trying to do anything other than follow the muse - exactly what I had always tried to do with my music.

Nothing was off limits. My own imagination was the guide, just as with my songwriting. I was not aware that I had opened myself up to criticism any more than I had with my songs. It just didn’t matter. I was new then and nobody really knew me. I had not been analyzed and pontificated upon. I was just doing what came naturally - having a great time with my friends, spending my own money because I had no script and did not want to present my ideas to anyone for approval. I was never at that stage.

Film making for me was just another form of expression, another way to pass the time in the vibrancy of my young and innocent life. I put it all in, everything that mattered to me, with no attempt to judge or manipulate to tell a story.

‘Journey through the Past’ will screen in the Hearse Theater
ny

REVIEWS...

Hoping to Journey Through the Past again!

01-30-03
It's been almost 30 years since I've seen this, so my memories are very foggy. It's comprised of lots of footage of Neil Young and band members (including Crosby, Stills and Nash) in concert and rehearsing (I can clearly remember them rehearsing the song "Alabama" in a barn somewhere in Alabama). But the film is mostly a cornucopia of Neil Young's eye view of the rural South circa 1972. Lots of rainy footage from the band's bus: that sort of thing. There's footage of an American Legion meeting with a rather healthy, corn-fed, white audience singing "God Bless America". That's interspersed with footage of the poverty-ridden conditions of the neighboring black towns (the South was still very segregated, and there were still significant numbers of people living in what was akin to Third World living conditions). There are two other scenes that I can recall. One is a scene with Neil and his wife (girlfriend?) eating strawberries, which is only memorable because it's so lonnnnng! The other scene is a very trippy one, with guys dressed up as Ku Klux Klan members riding on horses on a beach, while the soundtrack from "King of Kings" is playing. Outrageous and fantastic! As memory serves, I don't think it was a great film, but it was a rare opportunity to see glimpses of America not shown by Hollywood or on television. And if you're a fan of Neil Young, it's a chance to see him performing relatively early in his career. I think the film would be more essential to audiences today, because while the new young generation is always putting down on the "hippie" generation of the sixties, they've no idea what it REALLY was like, and how much it has changed - thanks to activists who fought the system and demanded change.

I had the soundtrack record to this back in the seventies. It was quite good! It's a shame it was never released on CD. A CD of that, and a DVD of this film is long overdue!

Any fan of Young's artistic waywardness will find this enjoyable.

07-07-08
Having been a fan of Neil Young for several years, I never thought I'd get the opportunity to see this rare film. However - a bit of online sifting is all it takes nowadays, and Journey Through The Past is out there as a BitTorrent. Not sure if this is something IMDb condone, but I'm sure they'll let me know by deciding whether to post that or not! The copy I've found is clearly from an nth generation videotape (how it found its way on to any videotape I'm sure is a story in itself, as the film never found commercial release outside of the few cinemas that showed it) and the picture is washed-out, occasionally wobbly but essentially watchable. Basically no worse than finding a vintage first-issue Chainsaw Massacre tape, or any video nasty of a similar age.

The film itself has had a reputation over the years for being poorly conceived and poorly received; an incoherent navel-gazing exercise that probably didn't even make much sense to Young once the pot wore off. What must be considered, though, is that much the same was said of Young's '73-'75 album releases in their day, and much of his music from that "Dark Period" is now held to be among his strongest work. Hence my summary headline above; if you appreciate the myriad tangents that Young went off on during his 1970s recorded work, then you'll at least know where this film's coming from.

In more detail then, Journey Through The Past is part-documentary of Young's first five-six years as a recording, touring artist; and smaller parts road movie and surrealist fantasy. If you consider these three aspects together, you might get a sense of why this film reminds me on more than one occasion of Werner Herzog's late 60s-early 70s work, particularly Fata Morgana (there's even some brief desert scenes here among the fantasy sequences). That is, of course, if Herzog suffered a serious whack on the head and lost all of his directorial and editorial talent in a month-long amnesia; Young was no great movie-maker at this early stage in his career (and judging by Human Highway a decade later, probably wouldn't learn much more).

But therein lies a lot of the film's charm; when you hold this up against, say, Led Zeppelin's rather pompous Song Remains The Same, Journey Through The Past does have a lot going for it in its homespun unpretentiousness and intimacy. The countercultural-political sequence of the film, about 45 minutes in, might be clumsily handled, but you kind of get the idea. There's a fair amount of goofy comedic material here too, from a grinning Buffalo Springfield camping it up in a TV spot, to Graham Nash in a dapper gold waistcoat calling for the legalization of marijuana (after identifying a drummer-rolled joint at first sight), to a hard-hatted Young clambering around in a scrapyard then later giving some Jesus Freaks a pricelessly deadpan baiting.

And of course, if you want some electrifying footage of early CSN&Y, it's here providing arguably the highlight of the movie; you'll wish this footage went on for much longer. Much proof is provided that Stephen Stills was possibly the coolest human being in the universe during the early 70s. The 'Harvest' rehearsals do drag on a bit (thankfully not to the sheer tedium that they went to on the soundtrack album) but are still an interesting snapshot of Young's work-in-progress at the time. And if you're left bemused by the bearded wanderer/junkie, black hooded Klansmen, and the bishop, the general and their chauffeur in the fantasy sequences, I wouldn't take it too seriously. Young did pass it off as "No plot. No stars". Enjoy this film primarily as a great rock documentary. Seek it out!

Early Neil Young as Reality TV

10-25-03
This is an odd film to digest. Fans of Neil Young will appreciate it for its historical value, but it's very mundane in parts. It actually has the feel of Reality TV, but of a mostly wordless variety.

The camera follows a very long-haired Neil Young and his band riding an elevator, it shows them walking around in hallways, it shows them talking with sound-engineers. You see him walking around a junk-yard. You get to see Neil park his car and sit on the front-fender with a woman smoking a cigarette and eating berries and not talking for at least 10 minutes, just staring at the countryside. For some reason you also see Richard Nixon speaking at a Billy Graham Crusade.

Then again, you also see him playing some great early live concerts with Crosby, Stills & Nash, which is reason enough to see this film. But then the film becomes sort of a music-video, showing what appear to be black-robed Klansmen riding horses on the beach, and then what looks like a red-robed Catholic Cardinal riding in a limousine, all of which apparently has zero connection with the rest of the film. It's all edited together in a sort of stream-of-consciousness, which is perhaps the whole point, as that style of narrative was common in the early 70's.

If you can find it, view it for the concert-footage plus an example of Neil's fascination with disjointed imagery which sometimes flows together like a visual non sequitur.

For hardcore Neil Young fans only

06-14-12
As much as I've always enjoyed the music of Neil Young (starting with his stint in Buffalo Springfield, thru C.S.N.Y & (most)of his solo out put, I found this curious little film a head scratcher. It seems to start out as a documentary about...well...um, Neil Young in various phases of his career. Starting with some blurry video footage of Buffalo Springfield, in a television appearance, thru some sparse footage of Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young (gee...who would have thought?). If this film had pretty much stuck to this premise, it would have made for a satisfactory documentary. The problem is that Neil opted to let his film go totally out of control, careening into some abstract episodes that even most midnight movie fans would have found utterly confusing (no matter how much Marijuana they're behind). Now, don't get me wrong. If you think I'm some typical old fart that can't deal with anything out of the ordinary (I list films such as Eraserhead & El Topo as personal head movie favourites), guess again. Part of the problem of personal vision films is that sometimes the vision is so personal, the only ones that could grasp the message is the artists themselves. I'm not saying 'Journey Through The Past' is unwatchable, it's just that there is a treasure trove of much better stuff out there. It's still worth at least one look (for those who were not born yet & want to get a better idea what the 1960's & 1970's Hippie counter culture was all about). Originally slapped with an R-rating by the MPAA, this film contains much pot smoking & salty language. Pretty tame by today's standards.

Not made to watch under the influence

07-13-04
Yes, about 30 years since I've seen this film but some images from that night in Knoxville, Tennessee are crystal clear. My crowd and I had driven the 3.5 hours to Knoxville from Nashville (on other business) and had partied all the way. So, when somebody suggested we go check out this flick, the group was rather pliant.

If memory serves, it opens oddly enough with CSNY doing an in-studio, call-in interview at, I believe, WMC in Nashville. Trippy. Other random images, drawn through the years from a night of robust teenage drug experimentation:

Neil and somebody else sitting on the fender of an old, old car deep in the woods on a summer night right in front of an ancient country bridge. I seem to recall they were drinking moonshine from a jug and the headlights of the car were on, providing the only illumination. Looked like a good way to spend some time.

A close-up of a man's feet walking on a sidewalk, which went on interminably. Then, the film reverses and the feet walk backwards for a long time. THEN, the camera inverts and we see the feet walking backwards and upside down. Not good visual stimulation for anyone under the influence of hallucinogens. I remember we almost cried.

All these years I've wondered what it would be like to see the film again and with a clear mind. If you're a CSNY fan like me, it would be worth it. But, at the time, it was rather hard to stay awake, as I really had no business even attempting to watch anything that required something more than infantile concentration. The film turbocharged our stupor.

Deadman in the South

12-05-14
Given how brilliant this film could have been, Neil - as Bernard Shakey - is about as exciting as watching Bob Dylan tune a guitar (which doesn't want to be tuned) between songs and, eventually, Mr Dylan in/with/directing one of his own movies.

"Greendale", the DVD of Neil in Ireland presenting his acoustic interpretation of the work/text, shows just how amazing his talent is. However, brilliance aside, being stoned and self-congratulatory about CSN&Y (which at the time wasn't happening) does not forgive this almost illusive, unintelligible, allusion (for so it is) to the South that he hates - "Alabama" is a paean to this. All must be forgiven when Lynyrd Skynyrd reply most sincerely to his claims.

And yet, one wonders what would have happened had Jimi Hendrix taken Neil and the boys through the same landscape. Even with Stephen Stills as escort, the geography of the "Chitlin' Circuit" would have been alien to say the least. Still, long-haired hippies and weird musicians wasn't the way to go. There is a sense that the whole thing was set up as a battleground that really didn't happen.

Bernard has done much better things than this. Consider, for instance, the soundtrack to "Deadman". Then, perhaps, listen to the soundtrack and watch "Journey Into The Past" at the same time. It's surely better than watching paint dry. Hmmm... almost. 'Course I love Neil and Johnny both. Next!

Saw original print back in 1974

07-06-14
Was discussing the film this afternoon with a friend who hadn't seen it. I told him I was in a slightly altered state of mind when I saw it, and that it was the kind of film that you think afterwards you might have better understood with a clear mind. Not necessarily and probably unlikely. Our college film club was showing it on a Saturday night. It wasn't the sort of movie you'd see at the local theatre. The fact remains that one particular remark Neil made somewhere during the film hit me like a divine revelation. It totally changed my understanding of reality.

Might sound pretty far out, but I've often wondered about that film. Couldn't remember the title. If anyone tracks a copy down, put me on your list of people who are interested in seeing it again.


JOURNEY THROUGH THE PAST AND MUDDY TRACK : Premiere In Japan


PREMIERE IN JAPAN

NY

We are all very happy here at Shakey Pictures to have these two films showing in Japan. I hope all of our Japanese friends enjoy them. Hopefully, we will be sharing many more movies with you all in the future.
PEACE
ny

爆音上映15年記念  ニールヤング監督作 『ジャーニー・スルー・ザ・パスト』 『マディ・トラック』 伝説の二作が日本初爆音上映決定!

1月10日 大阪 梅田クアトロ(http://www.club-quattro.com/en/shibuya/) 1月15日 東京 渋谷クアトロ(http://www.club-quattro.com/en/umeda/

一般販売:12月26日 チケットぴあ、 ローソンチケット、e+, 渋谷・梅田クアトロ店頭にて販売 いまや全国各地で開催され、多くのいまや全国各地で開催され、多くのファンを抱える“爆音映画祭”。その誕生のきっかけとなったのが2003年11月のニール・ヤング来日だった。来日を記念して吉祥寺バウスシアターで行われたニール・ヤングのライヴ・ドキュメンタリー『イヤー・オブ・ザ・ホース』(ジム・ジャームッシュ監督)のライヴ用音響システムを使った上映企画、その発展形として翌2014年5月に生まれたのが“爆音上映”である。その後、“爆音上映”は“爆音映画祭”へと発展し、多くの映画ファン・音楽ファンを魅了してきた。いまや全国各地で開催され、多くのファンを抱える“爆音映画祭”。その誕生のきっかけとなったのが2003年11月のニール・ヤング来日だった。来日を記念して吉祥寺バウスシアターで行われたニール・ヤングのライヴ・ドキュメンタリー『イヤー・オブ・ザ・ホース』(ジム・ジャームッシュ監督)のライヴ用音響システムを使った上映企画、その発展形として翌2014年5月に生まれたのが“爆音上映”である。その後、“爆音上映”は“爆音映画祭”へと発展し、多くの映画ファン・音楽ファンを魅了してきた。

この度、爆音上映の15周年を記念して、ニール・ヤングによる伝説の監督作『ジャーニー・スルー・ザ・パスト』、『マディ・トラック』(いずれもバーナード・シェイキー名義で発表)二作の日本初上映となる爆音上映イベントが開催決定した。 今回はいずれも日本語字幕を付けての上映となり、梅田クラブクアトロ、渋谷クラブクアトロを皮切りに全国を爆音上映で巡回予定だ。 boid主宰 樋口泰人

Commemorating the 15th anniversary of Bakuon (Roar) Film Festival with Japan’s first Bakuon premier of 2 legendary films, “Journey Through The Past” & “Muddy Track” directed by Neil Young

Jan 10 Umeda Quattro, Osaka Jan 15 Shibuya Quattro, Tokyo

GENERAL TICKETS ON SALE: Dec 26
Ticket Pia, Lawson Ticket, e+, Shibuya/Umeda Quattro

http://www.club-quattro.com/en/shibuya/ http://www.club-quattro.com/en/umeda/

Bakuon film festival, held throughout Japan, started back in Nov 2003 when Neil Young came to Japan for Greendale tour. We organized an obscenely loud film screening of “Year of the House“ by Jim Jarmusch with real concert speakers in Kichijyouji Baus movie theatre. The program developed into “Bakuon Film festival” and attracted so many cinema and music fans changing how we experience cinema.

Commemorating 15th years of Bakuon, We are proud to present two of the legendary films directed by Bernard Shakey for the first time in Japan.

Both films will be subtitled in Japanese and expected to tour the whole country in 2019 after Umeda & Shibuya Quattro show.


NYA APP IS HERE! : High Res everywhere!


High Res everywhere!

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Try it out and let us know how you like it!

The Android version is on its way. It encountered cobwebs in the tunnel. They have been partially cleared by volunteer Elves.

We will be giving you many hints on how to get full High Res from the archives app. NYA is streaming High Res where you are. Watch for articles at NYA.

Merry Merry!
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DO BOOMERS HAVE BETTER SOUNDING HOME MUSIC SYSTEMS THAN MILLENNIALS? : When I’m 64


When I’m 64

By Tom DeVesto

There are high fidelity enthusiasts and music lovers today from all generations.

But, it seems to me, there is a dividing line between Millennials and Boomers regarding their inherent understanding of the importance in delivering music the way the artist intended it.

With Boomers our mission as product designers has always been to demonstrate that our equipment delivered the musical art form as accurately as possible.

We grew up listening to high resolution, high-quality vinyl records.

Millennials on the other hand grew up with buds in their ears or at best, some cranky Bluetooth speaker. Both were good enough to listen to their low resolution, highly compressed MP3 files. In many cases as little as 5% of the artist’s original music makes it to their ears.

When I speak to Millennials about sound quality a fair amount of energy goes into explaining the value of the sound quality itself. About the endless hours the designer spends making sure that each part of the musical spectrum delivers everything the artist intended and nothing more.

There is an octave to octave tonal balance that needs to be maintained so that musical instruments are true to their acoustics.

It is important that voices, both male and female, can be heard as if one was standing in front of the performer as opposed to hearing them down at the end of the long hallway or behind a curtain.

If you carefully select the source of your music and the equipment you play on you can still get great sound today. But it is not going to come out of those little plastic boxes.

I was 21 years old and “When I’m 64“ came out by the Beatles, turning 64 seemed like a really long way into the future.

Little did we know that the level of high fidelity resolution of the equipment we were listening to then was going to turn out to be better than most of the stuff available in the future.

When the Beatles sang “will you still need me”, had we been able to see into the future, the answer would’ve been a resounding yes.

Tom DeVesto
http://www.comoaudio.com/


'SONGS FOR JUDY' : Behind the Scenes songsforjudy-back1408


Behind the Scenes

Cameron Crowe and Joel Bernstein

Cameron Crowe and Joel Bernstein tell how they did it.

In late 1976 and early 1977 Joel and Cameron got together and built ‘Songs for Judy’ from a pile of cassettes and memories. This is how it happened...

Cameron:
Joel Bernstein and I first met on a crisp morning in March, 1974. It was already an auspicious day. Neil Young had agreed to join The Eagles for a benefit at the Cuesta College Auditorium in San Luis Obispo. We were all together for the bus ride up the coast. Neil was notoriously press-shy at the time. I snuck onto the bus as a guest of the Eagles. There is a picture from the day, taken by Joel.

Behind me, Neil is playing an early version of “For The Turnstiles.” (Later, passing some oil derricks, he would begin writing part of “Vampire Blues” on the same bus ride.) I’m just hunkering down trying to look like I belong. We became fast friends that very day -- Joel the photographer (and guitar maestro-technician), and me the journalist. Our shared aesthetic was rigorous. As fans, we loved the raw and the real. For example -- the demo was usually our favorite version of any given song. Joel the artist worked almost exclusively with available light. We viewed ourselves as documentarians, there to catch the spirit in the air. We even had a nickname for ourselves – Eyes and Ears (from the old movie newsreel "The Eyes And Ears Of The World") . We still do. Joel and I went on many assignments together, and one of our early adventures was for Rolling Stone. I was invited on Neil Young and Crazy Horse’s 1976 North American tour. Joel was already on tour as Neil's guitar tech, and was also documenting the shows by recording them. Full disclosure: I was in heaven.

songsforjudy-bus1408

Joel:
I'd been the photographer on Neil's Time Fades Away tour in 1973; Neil was tuning his own acoustic and electric guitars himself before each show with the help of a Conn Strobotuner, a curious device featuring a display with a backlit, spinning disc of concentric circles. Based upon the stroboscopic effect (as when a plane's propeller or wagon wheel appears to stand still or be turning backwards), it could show very fine, real-time information, when read correctly, of the pitch of a plucked guitar string and enable acoustic or electric guitars to be precisely tuned.

One night, he remembered that back at the Electric Factory in Philadelphia, I'd tuned his Martin D-45 quickly and well when he had to go onstage. So, a bit like Huck Finn showing Tom Sawyer how to whitewash a fence, he explained to me how to use the "strobe," and I then tuned those guitars for him before each show. I then became a guitar tech first for David Crosby & Graham Nash and then for Bob Dylan's second Rolling Thunder Revue earlier that year.

Before going on Neil's tour, I'd gotten a Uher portable cassette deck so that I could listen to my favorite recordings on cassettes made from LPs and tape recordings while I was traveling. I asked my friend and, my friend Bob Sterne if I could get a feed of the PA mix made by Neil's house engineer Tim Mulligan to my guitar work station by the side of the stage, so that I could record while I was working. These would be of only incidental interest to Neil, because these were mono cassettes of the PA mix, unsuitable for release b) Tim was also recording the shows on cassette from the front of house, which technically should have been superior to mine, and c) because earlier shows on the same tour, in Tokyo and London, had been professionally recorded and were already being fashioned into a live album. Nonetheless, having been on tours with Neil for years, I knew that there would be magic.

The stage was moodily-lit by Chip “The Brown Acid... is not specifically too good” Monck. Neil stood at the center, between two antique-wooden Indians, each holding a legendary guitar. One, a Gibson Flying V, and the other the even-rarer Gibson Explorer. These were not incredible reproductions. These were the real guitars.

Cameron:
The shows were reckless and beautiful. Every night. The evenings began with an hour-long acoustic solo-set from Neil. The acoustic portion of the evening morphed nightly, often fueled by a smoke or two just behind the curtain. After a break, Neil and Crazy Horse would return for a barn-burner of an electric-set designed to level the place. They succeeded nightly. Just two years after the big-arena explosion of CSNY’s 74 summer tour, Neil was back with something even more potent and personal.


Joel:
The tour began at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion in downtown Los Angeles on November 1, 1976, the day before Election Day. Neil started with a solo acoustic version of a powerful, unreleased song called "Campaigner." I immediately realized that making these tapes was in fact a great idea. I was soon raiding malls for whatever blank C-90 cassettes I could find along the way. The U.S. leg of this tour was brief (18 shows in 12 cities, in 24 days) but the performances were at their best intense and thrilling. As the tour continued, the cache of cassette-tape grew, all of them filled with gems.

Midday through the tour, on Neil's 31st birthday, he invited Cameron and I onto his tour bus, Pocahontas, parked in the snow in front of the Edgewater Inn, in Madison.

Cameron:
Eight months earlier, Joel had been on nearby Lake Mendota, photographing Joni Mitchell skating for her Hejira album. Otis Redding’s plane had crashed, I think, in the same vicinity years earlier. The whole area felt rich in musical lore...

Joel:
Neil and I might have smoked a joint. Then Neil said, "Oh, I've got to make a phone call." This no doubt meant that Neil would have to return to the hotel, but he stayed put. "Just wait a second," he said, and opened up a leather attaché case on the table. Inside was a telephone that looked like a prop from the 60's TV show Get Smart. "It's a satellite phone," said Neil. What is that? It's 1976! We're on his bus! He makes a call to Mo Ostin, president of Neil's record label, and to our amazement, cancels the release of his 3-LP compilation Decade; months in the making, already pressed, and scheduled to come out imminently.

Cameron:
(The Rolling Stone piece had been assigned to come-out in tandem with the album. Now we were all suddenly in free-fall.)

Joel:
The last two shows of the tour were to benefit the restoration of Atlanta's historic Fox Theater, where we were playing. After the first show, an unusually long interval occurred before the second, midnight show. To celebrate the end of their months-long international tour, the band had found an excellent combination, that included at least Tequila and marijuana, with which to commune. One of the results, when the midnight show began after one, was the unparalleled rap in which Neil conjures up the spirit of Judy Garland, a vision which would have vanished but for this recording. By the time the last show was over, and we loaded up the trucks for the last time, Tim Mulligan, Neil's mixer, and I realized there was no point in trying to get any sleep; we had to catch the earliest flight to San Francisco. It was Thanksgiving, but we both had another show later that night with Neil... they said it was going to be called The Last Waltz.


Cameron:
Joel and I made a pact. After the tour, we’d get together at Joel’s San Francisco apartment, and make our own “essential” audio-compilation of the tour. The goal was to create our definitive collection of the acoustic and electric performances. Each would feature one performance of every song that had been performed, and it should fit onto a ninety-minute cassette. We began, of course, with acoustic sets. Joel listened to all the performances and whittled them down to three or four best-versions. In some cases, if Neil only performed the song once, that one version would be included.

The acoustic shows were sparkling, sometimes stoney, often surprising, and always heart-felt. You might get a “Losing End,” or even a “Love is a Rose.” Neil would regularly engage in conversations with the audience, including one epic monologue from a late show in Atlanta that became a darkly comic-centerpiece of our collection. Young had always been a sharply witty stage conversationalist, but this one intro to “Too Far Gone” took a psychedelic journey to Oz and back. For days we listened and compiled. It was deliriously painstaking work. Wake up, eat breakfast, dive back into the recordings. Decide which of the 12 versions of “Old Laughing Lady” was most essential. Repeat.

Joel:
Cameron, reading your account reminds me of just how much fun it was to do the listening and our notes, and discuss each performance until we agreed "that's the one." After you and I made our selections, I went next door to Graham Nash's home studio, Rudy Records, and transferred each song we'd chosen to reel-to-reel, then cut it together into two reels, one for each side of a cassette. I made three cassette copies of the tape compilation; two went to the two crew members who got me the audio feed of Tim's PA mix each night. (Audio nerds: to accomplish this required these adaptors: XLR > 1/4" > RCA > DIN.) At the time, it seemed the right way to repay them for taking the time to do that.

I cautioned them each not to copy the tape, and to keep it in a safe place. A few years later, one of them called to tell me he couldn't find his copy of the compiled cassette. A little later, a copy of a copy of a copy of that cassette became the master tape for a bootleg LP; just what I'd been trying to avoid. Years later, I was interviewed for Neil's fan club magazine, Broken Arrow, and was asked what I knew about this (to fans) mysterious compilation, and told the story to the journalist, who wrote a piece about it, after which the bootleg was referred to as "The Joel Bernstein" tape.


Cameron:
We never made it to the electric sets. Such was Joel’s attention to detail, and our shared commitment to exploring every crevice of the 1976 acoustic rabbit hole, by the time we finished part one, we were spent. We took a little break. Decades passed, but we always returned to the joys of this compilation. The tour had been so satisfying, and so different from all that rock would become in the ensuing years, something indelible was captured in our humble collection. Listening to it today is a little like discovering postcards from home. It was a precious time in Neil Young’s journey, a breath of oxygen in between some of his biggest adventures. Everybody involved was cresting towards another career peak, Rust Never Sleeps was just around the corner, and you can close your eyes and imagine the thrill in the room. It’s Bicentennial year in America, Neil Young and Crazy Horse are in your town, and out walks Neil with his acoustic. Press play.

Joel:
Meet you back at my place this fall. Let’s start the electric-set compilation...

Cameron:
Sounds good. I remember a blistering 9-minute “Cortez the Killer” from the Dane County Coliseum, in Madison that was absolutely essential...

Joel:
Here we go again...

by Cameron Crowe and Joel Bernstein

© Eyes and Ears Productions 2018